Meaningful differentiation strategies

By Benito Opitz

That society has become more critical over the last few years is not just a marketing ploy. We are constantly confronted with new examples of how user demands are increasingly specific and hold ever more sway over brands.
Within this article, I will outline two strategies that help brands to deal with the increasing potential for criticism. The secret lies in a higher, more meaningful form of differentiation than we have known in the field of marketing so far. A new form of differentiation that makes brands so meaningful that they might be protected against the hysterical form of social criticism that we observe regularly in the digital age.

Survival of the Relevant: The Evolution of Brand Governance

By Rupali Steinmeyer

Even at the risk of sounding somewhat polarizing, there is truth to the argument that brands are in a state of paradoxical crisis. The possibility of becoming irrelevant and disappearing is real in this competitive world. Many brands have already been negatively impacted. Some have seen their intrinsic value erode. Others have seen dwindling customers. Several have even folded. And while some manage to work their way back to success, they remain few and far between.

A Brand’s opportunity to nudge – for good.

By Anika Jessen

In 2017, Richard Thaler was rewarded with the Nobel Prize for Economics. “He makes economic research more human”, declares the official statement. His lifework focuses on the influence of psychology on economic behavior.

But unlike most researchers, Richard Thaler is not just known to the experts in his field. In 2011, he published a book in cooperation with Cass Sunstein, which some of you may know: Nudge. The underlying concept, so called ‘nudging’, is defined as a choice architecture that alters people’s behavior in a predictable way.

Watch Your Language

By Cornelius Hummel

Recently, my colleague Matthias Höckh wrote about the dangers of guidance overkill. When implementing a brand in an organization, too much information can be paralyzing and thwart the actual goal: to provide infectious energy and create momentum. That’s why when we define a brand, we try to keep it as simple and as brief as possible. At MetaDesign, we feel strongly about our proprietary brand model, which is based on few but very strong and clear elements.

On the Road, In the Flow

By Christian Manns

Even though three years have past since we started working for our client TVS, I remember the beginnings of the project as if it was yesterday. Because the way we got to know the client was very special. It was definitely one of the most impressive experiences of my career, and I feel like it’s worth sharing.

Revolutionizing a Tired Industry: What Brands Can Learn from Casper

By Molly Davis Lind

There’s a new startup on the block that is rocking the sleep world – and the brand world.

Casper believes “we are how we sleep” and offers a mattress-in-a-box solution that meets “the Goldilocks standard of ‘just-right’” firmness. Selling between $500 and $950 a pop, shipping is free (and delivered via messenger bike in NYC). Customers can try the mattress for 100 days with no strings attached. But what’s really riveting about Casper is not the product (truth be told: I haven’t tried it) but the actual brand.

THE POWER OF WORDS: 5 FACTORS FOR DEVELOPING SUCCESSFUL BRAND LANGUAGE

power of words

One of the biggest challenges brands face is determining how to speak in a way that is unique, relevant to their audiences, and expresses their core brand values. While we tend to experience a brand primarily through our eyes, a brand is more than a design system. This blog entry outlines five key success factors to help you create a strong brand language that is just as powerful as visual imagery.

Continue reading