Meaningful differentiation strategies

By Benito Opitz

That society has become more critical over the last few years is not just a marketing ploy. We are constantly confronted with new examples of how user demands are increasingly specific and hold ever more sway over brands.
Within this article, I will outline two strategies that help brands to deal with the increasing potential for criticism. The secret lies in a higher, more meaningful form of differentiation than we have known in the field of marketing so far. A new form of differentiation that makes brands so meaningful that they might be protected against the hysterical form of social criticism that we observe regularly in the digital age.

Your Design Sprint is Actually a Relay Race

By Jack Mitchell

“We work in Design Sprints.” We’ve all heard it, some of us have said it, for others, it’s on the horizon. The ‘made famous by Google Ventures,’ originally product-oriented working method has made waves across a number of industries as people everywhere refine and repurpose it to meet their needs in product, strategy, and even company culture. Unfortunately, it now also belongs to the most vilified cohort of words in the English language and, increasingly, many others: the buzzwords.

Survival of the Relevant: The Evolution of Brand Governance

By Rupali Steinmeyer

Even at the risk of sounding somewhat polarizing, there is truth to the argument that brands are in a state of paradoxical crisis. The possibility of becoming irrelevant and disappearing is real in this competitive world. Many brands have already been negatively impacted. Some have seen their intrinsic value erode. Others have seen dwindling customers. Several have even folded. And while some manage to work their way back to success, they remain few and far between.

Identity – At the Heart of Management

By Dr. Alexander Haldemann

Successful brands convince us by taking a strong stand. To do this, they need a clear identity.

Change – even profound change – has always been with us. In the past, however, change was more predictable and thus it could also be managed better. You had the annual plan, the strategic three-year and five-year plans. Companies were able to continuously plan their product development and the resources that would be required. They knew their competitors. They were in a predictable environment with more or less high barriers to entry.