Your Design Sprint is Actually a Relay Race

By Jack Mitchell

“We work in Design Sprints.” We’ve all heard it, some of us have said it, for others, it’s on the horizon. The ‘made famous by Google Ventures,’ originally product-oriented working method has made waves across a number of industries as people everywhere refine and repurpose it to meet their needs in product, strategy, and even company culture. Unfortunately, it now also belongs to the most vilified cohort of words in the English language and, increasingly, many others: the buzzwords.

Branding in transition – four ways to get it right

By Serge Barsotti

You have changed. You, me, we – the consumers of today. We have grown out of innocently accepting everything brands say, and grown into genuinely interested, cross-comparing and critically questioning consumers. We have become aware, talking about brands at any time and at any place – forming communities that serve as credible references. Yes, the consumers of today have become quite a tough audience.

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Beyond the brand: are you experienced?

By Filippos Petridis

As the modern-day economy marches on at a relentless pace, brands are being pushed further than ever before. Their core competencies are being challenged by the increased complexity, opportunity and volatility of nascent technologies. The ‘digital’ revolution has elevated consumer empowerment to an all-time high, and brands are expected to react.

Brand Coherence Eats Consistency for Breakfast

By Andreas Fachner

We need to talk about a word that we as branding experts use a lot and employ frequently to justify decisions when working on or with a brand; a word whose meaning appears crystal clear to us at first, but is worth a closer look: consistency.

Brand Strategies for a Digital World

By Lisa Krick 

For many years branding and corporate design agencies understood themselves as the “preservers of the brand.” After stripping down the brand’s content and identity to clear visual codes, it was up to the corporate design experts to preserve these codes consistently across all touchpoints and evolve the brand gradually over time. “360-degree marketing” became the mantra of tortured advertisers for decades. One relict of this era: the typical PowerPoint chart illustrating a brand that looks the same across all media touch points.

Branding with Zero Sugar

By Cornelius Hummel

I’ve recently changed my diet to avoid added sugar. You might have heard a phrase like this before — be it about sugar, meat, gluten, processed foods, and whatnot. So, well, yawn. By itself, another statement of a food hype apologist with missionary zeal wouldn’t be very interesting. But in the case of sugar at least, if you follow the news you’ll know that it’s not just me. There is a sizable and growing anti-sugar movement with a ton of media coverage. Even legislative action with taxes on sugar is well on the way in a number of countries. At the end of the day the message is clear: sugar is the new killer. That sticks.

Goliath Gives David a Lift

By John Winkleman

Reports of scandals and missteps at Uber over the last several months have been prolific. Allegations of sexual harassment, the theft of trade secrets, and regulatory obstruction, plus the resignation of CEO Travis Kalanick, created a sense of never-ending drama for the company and clouded perceptions of the brand.

A New Reality for Brands

By James Watson-Krips

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have become can’t miss buzzwords all over the world, and China – with its reputation for fast moving, tech-savvy consumers – is understandably no exception. In fact, “Virtual Reality” emerged as the most popular tech-related keyword on Baidu’s search engine in 2016, beating out other newsmakers such as AlphaGo and autonomous vehicles.

New Luxury Paradigms

By Amandine Rodrigues

There are three main myths about luxury that need to be discussed. One is the common misconception that luxury comes from the Latin word lux, or light, when in fact it comes from the term luxation, or dislocate. Luxury is not about glitter, shiny, and bling but about distance: it is about a product or a service accessible to the happy few.

Breaking Down the Walls

By Andy Giles

For decades, the way agencies like MetaDesign worked with their clients remained the same: The client defined what they needed and their deadline, and the agency structured a sequential engagement based on work phases over a number of months. During the course of the project, the agency would meet with the client periodically to conduct workshops and present work. Otherwise the two sides would work separately, within their own walls, communicating by email or phone when necessary.