Meaningful differentiation strategies

By Benito Opitz

That society has become more critical over the last few years is not just a marketing ploy. We are constantly confronted with new examples of how user demands are increasingly specific and hold ever more sway over brands.
Within this article, I will outline two strategies that help brands to deal with the increasing potential for criticism. The secret lies in a higher, more meaningful form of differentiation than we have known in the field of marketing so far. A new form of differentiation that makes brands so meaningful that they might be protected against the hysterical form of social criticism that we observe regularly in the digital age.

Your Design Sprint is Actually a Relay Race

By Jack Mitchell

“We work in Design Sprints.” We’ve all heard it, some of us have said it, for others, it’s on the horizon. The ‘made famous by Google Ventures,’ originally product-oriented working method has made waves across a number of industries as people everywhere refine and repurpose it to meet their needs in product, strategy, and even company culture. Unfortunately, it now also belongs to the most vilified cohort of words in the English language and, increasingly, many others: the buzzwords.

Survival of the Relevant: The Evolution of Brand Governance

By Rupali Steinmeyer

Even at the risk of sounding somewhat polarizing, there is truth to the argument that brands are in a state of paradoxical crisis. The possibility of becoming irrelevant and disappearing is real in this competitive world. Many brands have already been negatively impacted. Some have seen their intrinsic value erode. Others have seen dwindling customers. Several have even folded. And while some manage to work their way back to success, they remain few and far between.

Finding the Right Story

An Interview with Steven Cook

Steven Cook, who joined MetaDesign Berlin as Head of User Experience in April, in conversation with Linus Lütcke about the challenges of digital transformation, his advice to brands and how he sees MetaDesign’s role in the future.

Trying to Fix a Broken Workflow

By Alessandro Würgler

The current design workflow is broken. It was with this premise that the InVision team set out to develop their new incarnation: InVision Studio. The tool was unveiled in October for a January 2018 release, and promised to be “The world’s most powerful design tool”. Can they deliver?

Brand Strategies for a Digital World

By Lisa Krick 

For many years branding and corporate design agencies understood themselves as the “preservers of the brand.” After stripping down the brand’s content and identity to clear visual codes, it was up to the corporate design experts to preserve these codes consistently across all touchpoints and evolve the brand gradually over time. “360-degree marketing” became the mantra of tortured advertisers for decades. One relict of this era: the typical PowerPoint chart illustrating a brand that looks the same across all media touch points.

How to Keep Up: Honest Thoughts of a UX Designer

By Laura Müller

The world is changing constantly. The internet gives us access to all the information we need (and don’t need). Every day I work on UX challenges. I read blog articles, books, new usability studies, follow my heroes, and watch tons of videos. If I am really honest, I feel overwhelmed sometimes and have the feeling I can’t keep up with all the change happening around me. My brain doesn’t seem to get half of the stuff that’s out there. This makes me really insecure sometimes.

Analog Touchpoints in a Digital World

By Nora Schäfer

In a world in which everyone talks about digital transformation, the new truth seems to be clear: Analogue is old school, complicated, and slow. Digital is state of the art, convenient, and fast.

You Better Ask the User

By Martin Nobs

Our world is characterized by an extreme focus on the customer. We’re talking about user experience, user interface, customer experience management, and human-centered design. As a designer working in branding, I find myself asking the same question over and over again: does my work have the desired impact on the user? And as frustrating as it may sound, we will never know. Or let me state it differently: we will never know, unless we ask. So, why don’t we?