Defining the Fifth Element

By Simon Fuhrimann

Illustration is in the air! Not only is the stylistic device perfect for dipping into fairytales or attracting crowds to indie festivals, it has also significantly stimulated advertising, packaging, and web design. And yet illustration hasn’t drawn many lines in branding. What a huge loss, say we.

Why Retail Goes Beyond Interior Design

By Amandine Rodrigues

I recently came across an interesting article about how Silicon Valley is helping spread the same aesthetic across the world. Wherever you go, you see the same minimalistic pieces of furniture, reclaimed wood, succulent plants, and copper elements of decoration. This article came at a moment when yet another client was asking for more industrial lamps in the brand-new flagship store they were about to open.

All in a Name?

By Mauro Marescialli

In late March, Airbnb unveiled its Chinese name in Shanghai. And while the move was intended to start a new era for the brand in China, it instead went awry, earning ridicule from thousands of Chinese netizens, the likes of which were seemingly horrified by the new moniker. Following such a reaction, a barrage of articles published by ‘experts’ in the branding or naming field appeared on all sorts of media to educate us on the lessons to be learned from such an ill-conceived brand name, whilst — in the usual patronizing fashion — distributing advice on what is the correct methodology to adopt when coming up with a Chinese name for a brand.

What Type Is Your Face?

By André Stauffer

We personalize our sneakers, our muesli, and our Coke. We personalize our car, our perfume, and the flavor of our electronic cigarette. The more “me,” the merrier. And if things are not customized, they’re simply standard. And nobody wants to be standard. So my question is: why the heck are we still writing in Arial?

Brands Drive Growth

An Interview with Michel Gabriel 

What roles do collaboration and social competence play in the success of a project? And what are the most important things to consider when assembling a team? Michel Gabriel, head of client management at MetaDesign Berlin, discusses these and other topics in a conversation with Linus Lütcke.

Analog Touchpoints in a Digital World

By Nora Schäfer

In a world in which everyone talks about digital transformation, the new truth seems to be clear: Analogue is old school, complicated, and slow. Digital is state of the art, convenient, and fast.

A New Reality for Brands

By James Watson-Krips

Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have become can’t miss buzzwords all over the world, and China – with its reputation for fast moving, tech-savvy consumers – is understandably no exception. In fact, “Virtual Reality” emerged as the most popular tech-related keyword on Baidu’s search engine in 2016, beating out other newsmakers such as AlphaGo and autonomous vehicles.

Watch Your Language

By Cornelius Hummel

Recently, my colleague Matthias Höckh wrote about the dangers of guidance overkill. When implementing a brand in an organization, too much information can be paralyzing and thwart the actual goal: to provide infectious energy and create momentum. That’s why when we define a brand, we try to keep it as simple and as brief as possible. At MetaDesign, we feel strongly about our proprietary brand model, which is based on few but very strong and clear elements.

You Better Ask the User

By Martin Nobs

Our world is characterized by an extreme focus on the customer. We’re talking about user experience, user interface, customer experience management, and human-centered design. As a designer working in branding, I find myself asking the same question over and over again: does my work have the desired impact on the user? And as frustrating as it may sound, we will never know. Or let me state it differently: we will never know, unless we ask. So, why don’t we?

The Challenge to Design Business

By Arne Brekenfeld

If you talk about design in Germany, you’ll find a very one-dimensional way of seeing things. To put it crudely, the general perception is still that design is about “making things look nice“ or “polishing the surface.“ Using design to impact innovation and transformation processes, as well as brand development, is not yet widely recognized. Even though the quality of German design is exceptionally high and there’s a strong design tradition dating back to the Bauhaus school almost a century ago, Germans often underestimate the potential of design.