Brand Strategies for a Digital World

By Lisa Krick 

For many years branding and corporate design agencies understood themselves as the “preservers of the brand.” After stripping down the brand’s content and identity to clear visual codes, it was up to the corporate design experts to preserve these codes consistently across all touchpoints and evolve the brand gradually over time. “360-degree marketing” became the mantra of tortured advertisers for decades. One relict of this era: the typical PowerPoint chart illustrating a brand that looks the same across all media touch points.

Design Is Future

By André Stauffer

Imagine your MacBook with an engraved banana. Or your Mercedes with a shiny crescent moon. And imagine Coca-Cola old and grumpy. Slightly irritating ideas, aren’t they? These alone prove what design is able to do to us. And furthermore, that design not only supports the success of a brand but makes it happen in the first place.

Analog Touchpoints in a Digital World

By Nora Schäfer

In a world in which everyone talks about digital transformation, the new truth seems to be clear: Analogue is old school, complicated, and slow. Digital is state of the art, convenient, and fast.

The Challenge to Design Business

By Arne Brekenfeld

If you talk about design in Germany, you’ll find a very one-dimensional way of seeing things. To put it crudely, the general perception is still that design is about “making things look nice“ or “polishing the surface.“ Using design to impact innovation and transformation processes, as well as brand development, is not yet widely recognized. Even though the quality of German design is exceptionally high and there’s a strong design tradition dating back to the Bauhaus school almost a century ago, Germans often underestimate the potential of design.

New Luxury Paradigms

By Amandine Rodrigues

There are three main myths about luxury that need to be discussed. One is the common misconception that luxury comes from the Latin word lux, or light, when in fact it comes from the term luxation, or dislocate. Luxury is not about glitter, shiny, and bling but about distance: it is about a product or a service accessible to the happy few.

The Dangers of Guidance Overkill

By Matthias Höckh 

A vital part of our work as strategists is not only to develop brands but also to implement them in organizations. This is a challenging task, especially when we are dealing with large and complex organizations. One key question is always how much information is really necessary to anchor the brand in employees’ minds and hearts.

The Samsung Galaxy Crisis

By Alexander Haldemann

Samsung’s brand crisis is worse than I thought it would be. The real severity of the problem dawned on me last weekend as I prepared to fly back to Zurich after a vacation with my family. Having just boarded the plane, I was busy getting settled in my seat when something unusual caught me by surprise.

My First Ten Minutes

By Cornelius Hummel

As brand strategists, we are generally expected to be comprehensively informed about a brand. This can be challenging when the area is unprecedented and there is little time to do a thorough research. At MetaDesign, we’re lucky to count on a team of highly capable research analysts who can deliver amazing results at short notice. Their work provides the perfect ammunition to surprise clients with a comprehensive understanding of their market right off in the first meeting.

Disproving Ideas

By Cornelius Hummel

In my last post, I wrote about leveraging data to challenge assumptions, which for me as a strategist is crucial for gaining a deeper understanding of a brand or a market. Today, I want to build on this exercise and illustrate that it’s just as important to challenge the thoughts and ideas that we develop along the way.